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My Thyroid Tests (Take I)

January 8, 2010

Wednesday I got back the results of all the tests that the regular doc put in for me based on my holistic doc’s request. I am still waiting on my saliva test results for adrenal function, done at a different lab (and on my dime) and I will have to take the hormonal tests on the 21st. There are a few tests I may have to purchase from a lab on my own, depending on the events of the next few weeks. First of all a “comprehensive thyroid panel,”  at least at my health center, is far from comprehensive, and I think this is very important to know, in addition to knowing how dangerous it can be to depend soley on the TSH for diagnosis. My holistic doctor clearly asked for a free T3 and Reverse T3 test; my regular doctor took a look at his request and said ok.  What I got was:

TSH
Thyroxine (T4)
T3 Uptake
Thyroxine, Free (FT4)
Free T4 Index
T3 (Thyronine) Total

And everything was in range by the way; the Total T3 was at the bottom of the range, just as it was a year or so ago for my last thyroid panel. I asked where the Free T3 was and the doctor pointed to the T3 Uptake. I told her that wasn’t it and she pointed to the T3 Total. So I gave up and figured I would have to find and pay for the test on my own. It is confusing but here is what Dr. Kenneth Woliner says about the difference between Total T3 and Free T3:

Triiodothyronine (T3) is a thyroid hormone that circulates in blood almost completely bound (]99.5%) to carrier proteins. The main transport protein is thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG). However, only the free (unbound) portion of triiodothyronine (free T3) is believed to be responsible for the biological action. Furthermore, the concentrations of the carrier proteins are altered in many clinical conditions, such as pregnancy.

In normal thyroid function, as the concentrations of the carrier proteins changes, the total triiodothyronine level also changes, so that the free triiodothyronine concentration remains constant. (In an abnormally functioning thyroid, this is not necessarily so). Measurements of free triiodothyronine (Free T3) concentrations, therefore, correlate more reliably with your clinical status than total triiodothyronine (T3) levels.

Alien Robot Girl of Plant Poisons and Rotten Stuff sums it up beautifully in her latest post; I would refer you there if you are by any chance going through the same thing and in need of information about which tests are relevant.

I’m being referred to an endocrynologist, although I’m a bit surprised considering my normal test results. Its possibly due to the fasting glucose test, the results of which I will discuss in a separate post. This will be my first foray into endocrynology, considering I’ve always been denied my requests to see one in the past. There is a chance that she will take the Free and Reverse T3 for me but I am going to have to purchase them from an outside lab if she will not. And I am not expecting that she will. I would be experiencing high stress and anxiety now over the thought of the experience ahead of me, but I do not need to do so, considering that I have my holistic doctor working in earnest to actually figure out what is wrong with me, rather than trying to get me out of the office quickly and with the full weight of blame on my shoulders for all my physical ailments.

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3 comments

  1. […] What I can’t eat My Thyroid Tests (Take I) […]


  2. […] And his mom is hypothyroid and has been on Synthroid forever. The doctor (we have the same doctor, you may remember – she doesn’t know what a Free T3 is…) put him in for all the regular tests, including thyroid. January was just absolutely tragic for us […]


  3. […] And his mom is hypothyroid and has been on Synthroid forever. The doctor (we have the same doctor, you may remember – she doesn’t know what a Free T3 is…) put him in for all the regular tests, including a TSH for his thyroid. January was just absolutely […]



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